Pistol shrimps: How to recognise them in the fossil record

Matúš Hyžný (Slovakia), Andreas Kroh (Austria), Alexander Ziegler (Germany) and John WM Jagt (The Netherlands) Alpheid shrimps, colloquially referred to as “pistol shrimps”, exhibit a remarkable anatomical adaptation. These tiny marine crustaceans use their enlarged and highly modified claw to ‘shoot’ at their prey – hence their name. It is astonishing that the snapping claw evolved at least 30 million years ago. How do we know that? Because the fossils tell us. Fig. 1. Habitus (body form) of alpheid snapping shrimps, exemplified by the extant species Alpheus thomasi from the Caribbean Sea. (Photo: Arthur Anker.) The famous snapping claw Alpheid pistol shrimps represent a super-diverse group of benthic marine crustaceans (that is, living on the bottom of the sea, including the sediment surface and some sub-surface layers). There are more than 600 living species, nearly half of which belong to the genus Alpheus. Its representatives possess a snapping claw, a multifunctional tool used for various types of behaviour such as aggression, warning or defence, as well as for hunting prey. Although snapping claws evolved independently several times within various decapod crustaceans, only in pistol shrimps did this organ attain true perfection. Fig. 2. Pistol shrimps ‘shoot’ with an enlarged, modified claw. (Photo: Arthur Anker.) The process of snapping involves a cracking sound reaching up to 210 decibels, one of the loudest produced by any animal. This noise originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble in front of the claw, which, in addition, is accompanied by a short flash of … Read More

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Fossil crustaceans as parasites and hosts

Adiël Klompmaker (USA) Who would like to carry a parasite? I bet not many people would like to have one or more. They are nevertheless very common in humans and in other organisms, and can affect entire food webs including keystone species. They tend to be small compared to the host and the vast majority of them are soft-bodied. Despite their small size and soft appearance, they can affect the host substantially, for example, leading to a reduced growth rate and less offspring. Much of the same holds true for crustaceans – they are affected by parasites and can act as parasites themselves. For example, parasitic crustaceans are found among the isopods and copepods. Given the widespread occurrence of parasitism in and by crustaceans today, a fossil record of such parasitism may be expected. Swellings in fossil crabs and squat lobsters So what does the fossil record look like? I have been fortunate to have worked on this under-studied field of research. During my PhD research, I found various swellings in fossil crabs and squat lobsters (decapods from the superfamily Galatheoidea) during and after field work in northern Spain in reef carbonates from the mid-Cretaceous (upper Albian). They appeared to occur regularly in the back part of the carapaces of these crustaceans. Fig. 1. Bopyrid isopods from the species Orthione griffenis (large female and small male), removed from the right gill chamber of a modern mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis). (Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service, http://www.bugwood.org.) This swelling … Read More

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Ghost shrimps: An abundant yet understudied fossil record

Matúš Hyžný (Slovakia) and Adiël A Klompmaker (USA) The term “ghost shrimp” usually refers to decapod crustacean species from the family Callianassidae and Ctenochelidae, although sometimes the term is also used for other crustacean groups, such as caprelloid amphipods or, mostly in aquarium trading, for palaemonid shrimps. Here, we use the first definition. In that respect, ghost shrimps are soft-bodied, fossorial (burrowing) decapods with a tail (or pleon) distinctly longer than the main body (or carapace; Fig. 1). They inhabit a variety of marine environments or environments under marine influence, for example, estuaries, marshes and mangroves. Although most species living today have been described from the intertidal environment, there are numerous species dwelling in deeper waters as well. Fig.1. Ghost shrimp body plan. Glypturus acanthochirus: (A) view from above; (B) side-view; and (C) major cheliped. All scale bars 5.0mm wide. (Photos by Matúš Hyžný.) Ghost shrimps exhibit a sophisticated behaviour involving digging complex permanent or semi-permanent burrow systems, and they are important bioturbators. Because they live in high densities (in some cases up to 120/m2 of burrow openings are known), they rework huge amounts of substrate and are considered true ecosystem engineers. Bioturbation enhances organic decomposition, nutrient cycling, redistribution of organic material and oxygenation of sediment (similar to earthworms on land). Numerous organisms benefit from these changes, including bivalves, worms and other crustaceans. Additionally, many animal species live directly within the ghost shrimp burrows as their associates. Not every fossil ghost shrimp is Callianassa Fossil hunters specialising in decapod crustaceans … Read More

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