Fossil of the year, Germany, 2019: Encrinus liliiformis – a crinoid from the Triassic that made a career for itself

Jens Lehmann (Germany). Despite their common name ‘sea lilies’, crinoids are animals but not plants, although they look like a flower (Fig. 1). They are related to the sea urchins, sea cucumbers and starfish, groups that are unified as echinoderms (see, for example, Broadhead and Waters, 1980). Crinoids consist of… … Read More

Concretions in sandstones of the Inner Hebrides, Scotland

Mark Wilkinson (UK). Concretions are a common feature in many sedimentary rocks, yet they seem sometimes to be misunderstood. So, how do concretions form? As well-studied examples, let’s look at the ones found in some of the sandstones of the Scottish Inner Hebrides, notably the islands of Eigg and Skye.… … Read More

Fossil folklore: Molluscs

Paul D Taylor (UK). The final article of this series on fossil folklore focuses on molluscs, excluding the ammonites, which were covered earlier (see Fossil folklore: ammonites in Deposits, Issue 46, pp. 20–23). Molluscs are second only to arthropods in the number of species living today and the resistant calcareous… … Read More