Wealden insects: an artist’s update (Part IV)

An ‘artist’s impression’ of Wealden insects, inspired by the original work of Neil Watson, appeared in a three-part mini-series in Deposits issues 47 to 49. Since then, the discovery of a number of species new to science (belonging to diverse groups) has meant that an update was needed. Here are some completely new watercolours by Biddy, including the first true bug (heteropteran) from the Wealden, and the first Wealden earwig (dermapteran). Insects are arthropods and an accompanying Wealden crustacean is added this time. Photographs of actual fossils found in the Weald Clay Formation of Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian and Barremian) age are provided too. We are indebted to Fred Clouter, Terry Keenan, Tony Mitchell and Pete Austen (UK) for help with these images.

As before, Ed has supplied some explanatory notes to accompany the pictures, with more on the way. We have incorporated some new ideas on established species, such as different interpretations of the fossil lifestyle in the case of the ‘moss’ bug. Wealden insects are often disarticulated (due to transport in water). Where intact relatives are known from other contemporary deposits (especially Asia and Spain), these have been referred to, as well as recent representatives. While we can now recognise the commoner insect groups from the late age of the dinosaurs, continuing fieldwork shows that others remain to be unearthed. The artist’s job is ongoing, like that of the specialist and collector. We shall continue to periodically share the finds with you as a new generation of artist’s impressions.

Fig. 1(a). Extinct earwig, Valdopteron woodi Kelly, Ross & Jarzembowski.
This earwig differs from recent ones because it lacks forceps and has
segmented ‘tails’ instead; also, the wing cases (tegmina) are not smooth
and have veins. This is because it is not only a dermapteran (earwig), but an
archidermapteran (archaic earwig). The body is therefore based on Jurassic
Palaeodermapteron Zhao, Shih & Ren from China. The colour scheme,
however, was inspired by the Australian Brown Earwig and Apachyus
species.
Fig. 1(b). Valdopteron woodi, left tegmen, 6mm long, preserved as organic
(carbonaceous) impression (adpression) in sideritic ironstone concretion.

Fig. 1. Extinct earwig, Valdopteron woodi Kelly, Ross & Jarzembowski. This earwig differs from recent ones because it lacks forceps and has segmented ‘tails’ instead; also, the wing cases (tegmina) are not smooth and have veins. This is because it is not only a dermapteran (earwig), but an archidermapteran (archaic earwig). The body is therefore based on Jurassic Palaeodermapteron Zhao, Shih & Ren from China. The colour scheme, however, was inspired by the Australian Brown Earwig and Apachyus species.

Figs 2(a) and (b). Extinct moss bug, Yuripopovia woottoni Jarzembowski.
Only known from the Wealden with more than one included species, the
genus Yuripopovia Jarzembowski belongs to a widespread extinct family, the
progonocimicids. It is a Mesozoic relative of living peloridiids – the moss bugs
– which have a limited distribution in the Southern Hemisphere. According to
bug specialist (palaeohemipterist) Jacek Szwedo, Cretaceous progonocimicids
lived on trees rather than on mosses. Thus, two different colour schemes are
offered here: brown on bark (a) and green on foliage (b). The body is based on
Mesocimex Hong from the Chinese Jurassic.
Figs 2(a) and (b). Extinct moss bug, Yuripopovia woottoni Jarzembowski. Only known from the Wealden with more than one included species, the genus Yuripopovia Jarzembowski belongs to a widespread extinct family, the progonocimicids. It is a Mesozoic relative of living peloridiids – the moss bugs – which have a limited distribution in the Southern Hemisphere. According to bug specialist (palaeohemipterist) Jacek Szwedo, Cretaceous progonocimicids lived on trees rather than on mosses. Thus, two different colour schemes are offered here: brown on bark (a) and green on foliage (b). The body is based on Mesocimex Hong from the Chinese Jurassic.

Figs 2 and 3. Extinct moss bug, Yuripopovia woottoni Jarzembowski. Only known from the Wealden with more than one included species, the genus Yuripopovia Jarzembowski belongs to a widespread extinct family, the progonocimicids. It is a Mesozoic relative of living peloridiids -, the moss bugs – which have a limited distribution in the Southern Hemisphere. According to bug specialist (palaeohemipterist) Jacek Szwedo, Cretaceous progonocimicids lived on trees rather than on mosses. Thus, two different colour schemes are offered here: brown on bark (Fig. 2) and green on foliage (Fig. 3). The body is based on Mesocimex Hong from the Chinese Jurassic.


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